Tag Archives: copywriting

shadowy subjects

It was just last week that a certain rodent allegedly popped its head up to predict the weather. According to the “experts” they’re predicting 6 more weeks of winter weather.

From where I’m sitting, I’m seeing things a little differently. Maybe it’s the fact that I’m sitting here in short sleeves in the middle of February and it’s supposed to climb near 70F today (as it did yesterday).

Mostly, it’s because I believe my future is facing the sun, leaving my shadow — and this supposed bleak next few weeks — behind me.

I’m feeling good about the steps I’m taking even if at times it feels as if I’m just walking in place. I know that any movement is better than no movement. More important, you gotta know where you’re going if you want to end up in the right place.

No more throwing darts at a map. No spinning of globes and stopping the world with a fingertip in some random way. Now’s the time for planning, dreaming, organizing and just plain getting my head on straight.

One step — and day — at a time.

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

the devil is in the details….or is it?

Part of the challenge of being a creative writer is the overwhelming urge to share, and share everything. But sometimes you gotta show some restraint. It’s about the tease. Or just letting the brain complete the picture.

Here are a couple of new teaser ads that do just that. We don’t spell out the whole story. We let the viewer draw their own conclusion.

These are part of a campaign to help promote a new kid-friendly ER at one of our client hospitals. In addition to TV, these spots are also being shown on theater screens here in ABQ. Rich media web banners and outdoor bulletins are also in play.

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

power play

Sure, I believe some of the stuff I’ve written over the years has played a role in a purchase decision or two. But I never imagined I could have this much power. (cue wringing hands and sinister laugh)

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

the difference between marketing in US and other markets

There’s no question that, when it comes to advertising, the US market is much more…prudish.

Take a look at this M&M’s campaign Down Under…..

The sly innuendos. The fact that we’re watching “nude” M&M candies interact, including mixed company. (You never know what to expect when you mix crispy, peanut and plain. Whoa!)

But no matter how great the animation, as a writer, it gets very distracting to see typos.

Or maybe I just need to “confont” my own demons…..stripping away at my shell and face that even I’ve made typographical errors when writing copy. It is easy to “read” into what has been written and overlook very obvious errors.

Live and learn….

1 Comment

Filed under my life in advertising

we interrupt our normally scheduled program….

OK, so it’s election day in parts of the country. And, even though this blog is intended to talk about my life in and around advertising, I cannot help but chime in on some of the goings on.

There is a slight connection to advertising, now that I think about it. Especially after reading how one of the GOP contenders in my former home state has spent $71 MILLION!!!!!! of her own money to run TV ads for the primary.

I’ll say it. It makes me sick! Especially when I read things like A) our Supreme Court thinks big money has every right to give as much as they want to support their candidates (and to hell for those who don’t have the resources to fight back or the little guy/gal who doesn’t come from old money or have rich friends), and B) state parks across the country are closing because there simply isn’t enough money left in the till.

Is no one else bothered by the fact that companies spend billions lining the pockets of politicians on both sides of the aisle — combined with all the money spent invading another country (or countries) — when our own precious natural resources here in our own country are being padlocked and closed simply because there isn’t enough money? Not only are people being deprived of enjoying — and learning — about great natural treasures or historic sights, but there’s also the risk that, once closed, these parks are ripe for vandalism and neglect.

Where is our moral compass? Has it been sold to the highest bidder? Or has it simply been padlocked and left to neglect?

I know it’s easy to sit back and say “hey, it’s not in my backyard, so let someone else deal with it.” But that’s just it…it IS my backyard. This IS my country. But where do you start?

I think it’s obvious…right where I am. And right now. I have to stop sitting idly expecting people to wake up and see the consequences of our actions. I have to be the one who upholds my end of the bargain. To be the best person/neighbor/employee/friend/partner/constituent I can be.

I think that now is the time to stop giving money to politicians in the hopes they’ll make the right choices. It’s time to go direct to the source. Let’s channel our money and our energy to saving the parks and natural resources. Let’s use our efforts to make our own backyards a place that we can be proud of. Let’s worry about the issues that are local, and keep believing that local change will lead to a global movement that we all have to do our part. And, like it or not, we all have to work together — and get along — to survive in this world.

After all, it’s the only one we got.

1 Comment

Filed under my life in advertising

when mixing potentially gets messy

One of the “joys” of breaking into a new market is getting your name out there. There’s the slow, plodding cold-calling-one-person-at-a-time route. Or there’s tapping into big(ger) gatherings of like-minded professionals where the potential to mingle has greater mass appeal.

I’ve been attending the Ad Fed luncheons now for a few months, and have been lucky to meet some very nice people who have not been bothered by my constant nudging for introductions. These affairs are always sit down meals with guest speakers, with a little social time before and after. Granted, most of these attendees have to rush back to office jobs, but it’s been a nice, varied group I’ve met so far.

Last night was the big MarCom mixer. I had been told it was “the” event to attend for networking purposes. And it didn’t prove to be wrong. I met some great people last night, and had the opportunity to finally chat with some I’d been introduced to on other occasions.

The part I didn’t get (nor did I partake of) was the food. I never ventured over to the buffet tables to see the spread, but what I saw on people’s plates….well, it really made me LOL. Seriously, I know putting out a spread for a big group can be a challenge. I learned that from my 10+ years in the food biz. But when you have hundreds of people (with only limited opportunities to plop down to eat what you’ve scored off the buffet), why would someone choose RIBS and HUMMUS??!?!?!

Neither facilitate mixing by any means. One leaves your hands a mess, which makes me hesitant to shake any of ’em after they’ve been chowing. And the other potentially leaves your breath reeking of garlic, and would make even the strongest of us want to pull back when someone leans in to be heard over the noise.

That being said, the mixer left a great taste in my mouth. It was a successful evening of networking for me. And I’m guessing it was a success for the hosts, too. The agency’s office is way cool. And I hope to have the opportunity to hang around there more in the future.

There’s one thing I’m learning about this town, and myself, is that you do have to mix things up to be introduced to the right people at the right time. Even if that means getting a little messy in the process.

1 Comment

Filed under my life in advertising

the “duh!” heard all over the ad world

According to another article from BusinessWeek online….

A survey from IBM’s Institute for Business Value shows that CEOs value one leadership competency above all others. Can you guess what it is? (Wait for it…..wait for it….)

Da-daaa-dummmmm! Survey says!

CREATIVITY!!!!??!?!

Really! I know what you’re thinking. That’s what most of us in the ad biz do every day — come up with creative solutions to meet the needs of clients for their products and/or services. And as it is for me, it’s deep within my core. That “what is that USP and how can we use it to compel people to buy/click/call” drive that isn’t fueled by Red Bull or other caffeinated beverages. It just is.

But I suppose there is a unique process for those in the biz world who play in different sandboxes. (Although I read a very interesting take on the current state of the ad world a couple of days ago that mentioned how the influx of big corporate conglomerates has given more power to the finance people than the creative department, but that’s a whole different story.)

Until now creativity has generally been viewed as fuel for the engines of research or product development, not the essential leadership asset that must permeate an enterprise.

In face-to-face interviews with our consultants, they said creative leaders do the following:

Disrupt the Status Quo. Every company has legacy products that are both cash—and sacred—cows. Often the need to perpetuate the success of these products restricts innovation within the enterprise, creating a window for competitors to advance competing innovations. As CEOs tell us that fully one-fifth of revenues will have to come from new sources, they are recognizing the requirement to break with existing assumptions, methods, and best practices.

Disrupt Existing Business Models. CEOs who select creativity as a leading competency are far more likely to pursue innovation through business model change. In keeping with their view of accelerating complexity, they are breaking with traditional strategy-planning cycles in favor of continuous, rapid-fire shifts and adjustments to their business models.

Disrupt Organizational Paralysis. Creative leaders fight the institutional urge to wait for completeness, clarity, and stability before making decisions. To do this takes a combination of deeply held values, vision, and conviction—combined with the application of such tools as analytics to the historic explosion of information. These drive decisionmaking that is faster, more precise, and even more predictable.

So, I guess I’ll continue to think “creative disruption” (as opposed to disruptive creative….which can get annoying really fast if not abso-freaking brilliant in concept and execution). It’s how I roll.

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

signs, signs, everywhere a sign

It’s almost election time here in the ABQ. And we all know what that means….

They’re all over town, on practically every corner where they’re allowed. And it makes me wonder…..do these colorful rectangles of cardboard really work?

I know it’s an inexpensive way to get your name seen by the masses. But does it really say anything? I mean, I’ve seen at least 8 or 9 different names of people running for sheriff. But just because I see their name on a sign, does that mean I should vote for ’em? What am I supposed to do? Vote for one candidate because I happen to prefer the color blue?

I know this is akin to browsing down any big box/grocery/drugstore aisle. We all know it takes more than just being present to build brand loyalty. So do these hopeful politicos really think that having their supporters put signs up in yards/on street corners will really help people at the polls?

Besides, we all know it’s really those few candidates that raise enough money (or in the case of one governor hopeful here, having deep enough personal pockets) to get on the air. A recent poll showed the top 2 Republican candidates just happen to also be the only ones who are currently running TV spots. Coincidence? Naw…they must have more signs up.

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

of praise and copiers

“The average company takes better care of its copiers than it does its talent.”

So says an article for BusinessWeek.

I recall many days/weeks/months when I was punching a time clock (well, since I was salaried, there really wasn’t one) that I, like so many coworkers and others out in the business world, were putting in the extra effort under the guise of “it’s the right thing to do.”

Or was that more “I have to do it. Otherwise, someone else will, and I’ll find myself in the ranks of the unemployed.”

So I stayed chained to my desk. There was one stretch at one company where I ate 9 straight meals at my desk. Sure, I got to go home and sleep (a little), shower, change clothes, only to be back with my shoulder to the grindstone. But as my loved one (who I was barely getting to interact with, let alone see) reminded me….

“If you dropped dead in the office, they’d just step over you on the way to the copier.” Turns out it didn’t really matter. Despite the heroic effort put in by the whole team, the agency still lost the piece of  business, which led to all but 2 or 3 finding themselves relieved of their positions.

Kinda harsh. Then again, this economic environment is harsh. Sure, there is good news on the horizon. Recent numbers are showing that there is an increase in jobs popping up on the horizon, with fewer people competing for these new jobs and other vacant ones.

As a current freelancer who hopes that the right full-time job will come along soon, this is good to hear. Sure, freelancing has been good. But there have been obstacles. As more freelancers compete for opportunities, it often turns into a bidding war. But just how low can you go? There is a long comment stream on a group posting for freelancers who (for the most part) chastised one freelancer for (albeit innocently, for all general purposes) charging too little and over-delivering. The mob consensus was A) the guy was doing a disservice to himself by shortchanging his contribution to this particular project/company, and B) ruining it for all of us by charging so little.

I’ve been lucky to find companies who appreciate what I bring to the table, and pay accordingly. That seems to be one of the positive statements in the BusinessWeek article. Seems that the workforce is starting to wake up and realize they don’t have to settle for just any job. There is something to dignity and self-respect, even in this harsh, competitive market.

Only those companies that make the effort to keep their employees productive by treating them decently can expect to see continued productivity gains.

I’ll continue to freelance while building relationships with local companies in the hopes that I prove to be too valuable to not bring on full-time. And when I do, I’m hoping to hear these encouraging words….

“We’re hiring you for your talent—now go do something brilliant.”

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising

social awareness? or social suicide?

Name just about any large company these days, and chances are you’ll be able to find them on Facebook. Or tweeting their chubby lil fingers off. Sure, this prevailing trend to add social media to your marketing plan has been building for some time. But, is it really doing any good? Or is it really doing more potential harm?

I, personally, don’t connect with too many companies/brands on Facebook. There are a few like Peet’s Coffee and Moonstone Cellars that I “friended” but don’t necessarily “follow.” (This is especially true for Peet’s since I now live in a Peets-free zone.) There are also a few bands (like the Indigo Girls or Levi Kreis) that I follow, but that’s not exactly the same kind of fan that companies are rushing to FB to find IMO.

My journey into FB hell was mostly prompted by friend requests of the local sort. Once I exposed myself to the masses, people from high school and college were finding me online. I gladly accepted any and all friend invites. It was great fun to reconnect with some of the people I’ve lost track of. That is, until I started reading/hearing about the privacy issues that are running rampant on FB.

One of the latest can be found on gizmodo.com. The “Top 10 Reasons You Should Quit Facebook” lists a bunch of things that I know I need to think more about. And also be careful about.

If I, Joe the Individual, needs to be extra leery of not only an account being hacked, but also an identity compromised, what happens to all the individuals who “friend” a company/product/brand? Can all that information be hacked, too? Could a competitor be able to hack into the friend base of another in an attempt to sabotage or steal?

I don’t know the answers to these questions. I just know for myself that I have started to ween myself off FB, and striving to kick the habit of wanting to constantly check back with all the feeds.

Guess what it all comes down to is getting back to more face-to-face interaction, and less Facebook interaction. And to recognize that it’s not always best to be up with the latest and greatest marketing tools until said tools can guarantee that privacy matters.

Leave a comment

Filed under my life in advertising